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20130216
20130224
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
of religion is understood to be a completely private matter. in the statement by mendelssohn, in connection with france, he said to be a citizen in the streets but a jew at home, but that is not the message you get from the stable of kosher food in philadelphia. it is ok to be a jew in public, too. it is not a matter of expressing to the private. the spirit of freedom is perhaps unique to the united states in the world, but even here, even with that kind of sounding, and even with the words of the first amendment to express that, things have not always been so happy, and especially not always so happy for minorities in america. he was not then chief justice but the man who was going to become chief justice of the supreme court fought on the convention to exclude roman catholics. it was a big fight. he was defeated alternately, -- alternately, but that was an attempt, and it was not long after, and that was a time when catholics constituted less than 1% of the population of the united states and were no threat out all. as larger numbers of roman catholics came to these shores, especially fro
of that is that i am not arguing for morality, from religion, or from tradition. none of my arguments presuppose anything about the moral status of gay relationships. there are lots of valuable relationships that do not get recognized as marriage by anybody. that cannot be the decisive factor. they do not rely on any particular religious tradition. if they did, it would still leave something to be desired because something i will defend today has been common to religions across time and many cultures. we would still want to ask the question of what common feature was motivating those theologies rather than the other way around. and i am not arguing that because it has always been this way it always should be. another thing is that my argument cannot be answered by appeals to equality. we usually think that this is the right response when we think of the marriage debate as a debate about whether to expand or restrict a pool of people elible for marriage. it is true that from that perspective it looks like marriage is a good thing and should be available on an equa basis. i think that this debate
. >> reporter: and he repackages religion in a very unusual way. he's also a professional rapper, and preaches religion with rhyme. >> sometimes you have to do a little hip-hop, too. >> reporter: during a sermon? >> if need be. ♪ i'm trying to live it like christ ♪ >> reporter: as a rapper around the chicago area, the reverend is known as jay quest. >> what it really does is hopefully lead people into a greater understanding and awareness of themselves and their god. >> reporter: he's been preaching for ten years, he's been rapping professionally for about five years. they don't seem like they go together. but apparently they do. >> i don't think that i rap religion, though. i think that i rap about life, and i rap about the narratives of all of our experiences. i think that's the same thing that sermons are about. >> reporter: sermons and rap, the two have met. frank mathy, abc 7 news. >> whatever it takes. >> whatever gets the message out there is a good thing. so different people respond to different things. i like it. >> especially if you want to get to the younger demographic. that's
then that they get bitter king to guns or religion or antipathy towards people who aren't like them, or anti-immigrant sentiment or antitrade center. as with a toy to explain their frustrations. >> the comments became a big part of the discussion on the left-right culture war. republicans were happy to publicize his comments, but these days they're terrified they might be losing the culture wars on some front, and they may well will. let's look at the grounds on gay marriage. once unthinkable, nine states and the district of columbia have legalized same-sex marriage either by court degree, legislative action or actual popular vote. and now illinois, delaware, and hawaii are also considering legalizing gay marriage, same-sex marriage. and the rights retreat on cultural issues extends to other areas as well. i'm joined by lauren ashburn, found over the daily download and a contributor to the daily beast. oftenly confused with hillary rodham clinton. but not politically. let me talk about this, because you're on the front all the time fighting for same-sex rights and gay rights generally. isn't
, such as, for example, religion or os sa fied theorys that aren't based on what actually works but based on a religious ooh ooh ooh fervor. this is not the party of burke. i was teaching burke at columbia this week. my key question to the students is, you've read burke, conservatism. you thought you weren't going to like him. yet most of you hate republicans. what's the difference? >> wait a second -- >> i'm a great admirer of burke. i understand what you're talking about. i think part of the modern challenges of the movement in america was forged in the 1960s, before the great society. so there needs to be a reassessment of how you apply conservative principles to the 21st century. that philosophical is ongoing on. >> the author of the great director of mind. if he's watching, he's losing his mind because i think the whole persuasion of burke, burke is a radical calling your revolution. monar monarchist revolution. his whole point we liberals consider a have this argument, it was good conservatism back in the day. >> burke was in dialogue -- >> exactly, the ones who are no longer in pow
. was there any idea in your mind that he was motivated by religion and-- >> no doubt. in our training in the military. we're taught before a jihadist would perform their act. that's one of the things they say, god is great. that's their motivating piece to give them the imaging to perform any devious act they're going to perform. >> you say you want to make sure that the mistakes that led to this tragedy never happened again. and so what do you want to see happen? >> well, the individuals that were in charge of major hassan when he was at walter reed need to be held accountable, not by a lateral transfer from one department or one division to another. they need to be held accountable by showing dereliction of duty not stepping up and doing his job. the second thing. we need to have better lines of communications between all the federal services, the fbi and others were tracking major hassan and tonight let d 0 d did not let them know. and dod didn't let the fbi or homeland security the issues they were having this guy. >> alisyn: problems. >> tucker: yes, they are. sergeant, thank you
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)